Get Hardware Information

If you need information on system’s hardware like vendor, manufacturer, product, S/N, etc. you can use:

dmidecode

The dmidecode command reads the information from the system BIOS, see also http://www.nongnu.org/dmidecode/.

There are a few other commands you might want to check out which list installed hardware components:

dmesg
lsdev
lshal
lspci
lsusb
lsscsi


OpenSUSE vs Ubuntu

Abhay Srivastava at Techzone has written an interesting article on his experiences with openSUSE from the point of view of an Ubuntu user:

“I have used Ubuntu for almost 2 years and was completely in love with Ubuntu. One fine day my UPS gave up and my lazy self never allowed me to buy another. The result, after 5-6 power offs, my root file system was corrupted. I had to do a manual “fsck -y” to bring it up. I thought all is normal now, but after the second normal reboot, the files system completely gave up and no amount of fsck would help. It clearly means a re-install. It should have been OK in normal circumstances, but I was in the middle of a release at office and had no time for even small configurations. Hence instead of using my favorite Automatix, I went ahead with Ubuntu Mint. Oh that was a changing point. Mint is Ubuntu modified and Mint’ified. I have KDE on my Arch Thinkpad, so the greenish theme of mint was a welcome change from the brown Ubuntu. Mint had installed almost all the required software and codecs for me and enjoyed Mint for one month. I thought now I have Ubuntu + all the codecs, without and configurations. What else could I ask for ?”

Read the rest of “openSUSE vs Ubuntu” here

VitrualBox installation and Configuration on OpenSuse 10.2

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